Admin
February 25, 2016
[img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/3cf70d457ac563abeef704ccad276f3e_view.jpg[/img] Nigerian pastor David Oyedepo, who is also known as Papa, is the founder of Living Faith Church World Wide, which goes as far back as 1981. The international figure owns a Rolls-Royce Phantom, homes in the U.S. and U.K., as well as an array of private jets. [img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/658371bb9b097b25749be08589a72bc5_view.jpg[/img] The Israeli-American Evangelist established the Orlando Christian Center in 1983. Broadcasting healing crusades held in stadiums, his ability to ‘cure’ terminal illnesses such as cancer has, however, been a source of controversy, impacting the rise of his name, ministry, and finances simultaneously. [img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/d7b61e4a507267035daf11bd0b16fe02_view.jpg[/img] Joel Osteen is the senior pastor of Lakewood Church, Texas, which was founded by his late father, John Osteen. Lakewood stands today as the largest and fastest growing church in America with over 38,000 attendees every week. The charismatic preacher is also a best-selling author of over 15 notable titles. [img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/e96f39a9d1b63224277921799116ad48_view.png[/img] Nigerian Pastor Chris Oyakhilome, better known as ‘Pastor Chris,’ is the man behind Christ Embassy, a church and mission organization with offices in United Kingdom, USA, and South Africa. His other endeavors include magazines, newspapers, a TV station, a record label, hotels, satellite TV and real estate. [img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/8f9783a9d74ecb6fa81d52a459d7d0e8_view.png[/img] Pastor Dollar’s World Changers International ministry in Georgia commands a huge following with 30,000 followers. He says, “It is the will of God for you to prosper in every way.” That message is of course very hard to ignore with a bank account such as his. [img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/7d1399269d0ef2b3f6698f33ac77bf0a_view.jpg[/img] The ministry of 95-year-old revered cleric, Billy Graham, dates back to the 1940s, an era that witnessed him serve as advisor to several presidents, including Lyndon Johnson. [img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/0155b130a31f06dbfe7007a20e6b31da_view.jpg[/img] Rick Warren is the pastor of America’s eight largest church, Saddleback Church. He admittedly gives away 90% of his income and lives off 10%. [img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/3c505d3ed10d8c2453ce6790a7e527aa_view.jpg[/img] Charismatic Bishop, author, producer, and actor, T.D. Jakes is the founder and chief pastor of The Potter’s House in Texas. His ministry’s annual revival MegaFest draws more than 100,000 people from all parts of the world. [img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/d606dc2baab4342c7503ea6fc067e23f_view.jpg[/img] Pastor T.B Joshua founded The Synagogue Church Of All Nations in 1987. He is also the owner of Emmanuel TV, a Christian television network. Making a name for himself as one of the more charitable Nigerian Evangelists, Joshua is consistent in his humanitarian works in education, healthcare and rehabilitation programs. [img]http://blacksnetwork.com/file/attachment/2016/02/d141befaa9cbea8ed55ba1f6ac4baa27_view.jpg[/img] A Muslim until the age of 22, Pastor Ashimolowo converted to Christianity following his father’s death. Aside from producing a media company as well as Christian literature, Ashimolowo is now also the senior pastor of Kingsway International Christian Centre.

Admin
March 25, 2015


On a pre-programmed course in an old airfield in Alameda, Calif., a silverfish-shaped car meanders through a cardboard city full of frozen people and cut-out trees. Here at the edge of Silicon Valley, looking back across the bay at the San Francisco skyline and just minutes from Mercedes-Benz’s Research facility in Sunnyvale, the F 015 “Luxury In Motion” autonomous prototype vehicle makes its way — with the driver's seat comfortably swiveled 180 degrees to face backwards.

It sounds like something out of a sci-fi film, but this is Mercedes-Benz’s vision of the future — the year 2030 to be precise. The F 015 concept is quite literally a living room on wheels. Feel like driving? Swivel your chair and take control of the steering wheel that folds neatly away when not in use. Feel like working, relaxing, or talking? Swivel back around and face your fellow passengers; the car will continue to drive you to your destination. In Mercedes purview, life in the future is no longer about speed, but relaxation and the luxury of time.



While the F 015 is still a prototype, and not yet robust enough to make highway trips like over self-driving test cars, the approach to the design of the vehicle is straight from the pages of Steve Jobs. “Autonomous vehicles make sense because of the increased emphasis on the interaction between occupants," says Koert Groeneveld, head of research and development communications at Merecedes-Benz. "The cities of the future will be bigger, more densely packed and life will be more hectic. Time and private space will become a luxury.”


Inside the Mercedes-Benz F 015

It’s not only how the car impacts and interacts with its passengers, but how the car interacts with the outside world. LEDs in the front and back of the car flash words like “STOP” and “GO” across what would normally feature headlights and taillights. It is polite to a fault, insisting that pedestrians proceed first, projecting a laser outlined crosswalk in front of the car and instructing them verbally to “please cross,” tracking their movement across the field as they go. Mercedes notes that the windows are covered in a subtle dot pattern to keep people from seeing in, but which also limits visibility out.


Mercedes-Benz F 015 in San Francisco

Carriage doors open to allow easy access to the spacious interior. Seats swivel to welcome you inside and then swivel back to center when the doors are closed, a rolling silver cocoon isolating you from the outside world. Anyone in the car can become the “conductor,” choosing the interior look, feel, and speed of the car as it moves along. Slide a mark along a linear gauge and you can speed or slow the car. Change the scenery on the screens around you to Paris and the Louvre or abstract representations of the outside world by touching the screen and making a choice for your bubbles of virtual reality. The extreme soapbar physical design of the F 015 is centered on what Mercedes-Benz calls “soft transitions” — an easing back into reality, or out of it, as you move from your autonomous vehicle to your next destination.

The F 015 we conducted was solely electric-powered, and followed a GPS-plotted course showing what Mercedes imagines a typical interaction between car and human would look like. The driver summons the car from its parking spot using an app on their phone and waits patiently while the car comes to them (a feature Tesla has promised with the next major software update of the Model S sedan.) Then he or she climbs in and is whisked (albeit in this test case, slowly) away to their destination where the car then parks itself until the next time it is called.



It's obvious the technology that Mercedes-Benz has employed to create both the S500 Intelligent Drive and the F 015 prototype is phenomenal. The idea of auto autopilot for urban driving is incredibly appealing, and driving a car via smartphone feels like a Star Trek-level fantasy finally coming to life. But I'm not sure whether to feel inspired, scared, or both.

That world of 2030 seems implicitly dystopian, where luxury means isolation. In this vision, drivers and passengers are surrounded by an augmented reality of their own choosing — a world in which the car communicates with the outside world, and humans don’t. The other way of looking toward 2030 would see time as the precious commodity. Those who can afford it can find a space to freely do what they like, and not worry over the city-driving dullness of steering, accelerating, watching for pedestrians or braking.

In 15 to 20 years, do we become so wrapped up our own worlds that we won't be interested in interacting with the outside world? Will we not want to make eye contact with a passerby, let alone wave them to cross? Will we become so busy and self-important that we have to send the car to pick up the kids at school — as some overscheduled parents have already enlisted Uber drivers to do?

The F 015 presents a fascinating look at the future of driving and the almost-there technology involved in making it work. We are either moving toward a more crowded, isolated, self-centered world, or one that’s greener, safer and more connected than ever. We’ll just have to wait a few more years to find out — fewer than we realize.

By: Abigail Bassett

Admin
June 27, 2014




Gee Funding, Inc., national and international crowd-funding website where anyone can raise money for small business start-up, creative projects, film production, music project, art works, charity and just cause charitable donation, education and much more, is now accepting both project and charity campaign.

GeeFunding.Com is open to all,” said Godwin E. Enogieru, head of GeeFunding, Inc.



“If you need to raise money or help someone in need, there is no better time to this than now,” added the spokesperson, who believes everyone should have the opportunity to raise money hassle-free.

With GeeFunding.Com, everyone now has the ability to raise money to start whatever project; he or she has on the drawing board that needs to become reality. However, Godwin E. Enogieru, sounds a note of caution for persons wishing to fund their projects through crowd-funding means to be aware.

“Beware of crowd-funding sites claiming to be ‘100 per cent Free’. They will simply charge your donors instead and you will collect fewer donations as a result. Fees always exist when accepting payments online,” said Mr. Enogieru.

Despite that note of caution, crowd-funding websites can help persons find a community of small investors to fund their business, without the risks of traditional financing. While some sites focus on funding creative projects, others sites focus on meeting specific needs in the marketplace or community.

“So don’t let lack of capital hold you back - let the crowd fund you, as people all over the world are now using Crowd-funding platform like GeeFunding.Com to raise millions of dollars for all types of campaigns,” said the source.

No matter what someone is raising money for, Godwin E. Enogieru said they can start right now with GeeFunding.Com, which charges no fee upfront or application processing fee.

“We here at GeeFunding accept both project and charity campaign,” note the spokesperson.

Creating Fund raising Campaign is free, and applicants pay nothing to start a campaign until their campaign is fully funded. GeeFunding.Com, however, charges a fee of seven per cent of the total amount funded.

As it relates to how GeeFunding.Com approaches the crowd-funding process, Mr. Enogieru said it begins when a project owner submits a campaign to GeeFunding.com. Included in the fund raising project submission is a detailed description of the campaign, campaign owner’s PayPal email account is required, the target goal amount, and a specific fundraising duration.

If GeeFunding approves the project, after reviewing, he launched the project by posting in GeeFunding.com the campaign details, time period, and the target amount of the crowd-funding campaign for immediate backer’s access.
At the end of a campaign, GeeFunding checks to see if the target amount has been met (or exceeded). However, if the goal is not met, all pre-approved transactions are cancelled and no backer's or pledge’s account is debited for the campaign. No money collected.

If the target is met, GeeFunding platform triggers the pre-approved payments from the PayPal accounts of the campaign backer's. In a chained payment model, the funds are moved to the project owner's PayPal account first, after which a pre-determined portion of fees (PayPal 2.9 per cent) and commissions (GeeFunding seven per cent) are deducted from the fully funded project owner's account. In the parallel payment model, funds are instantly transferred to both primary and secondary PayPal accounts upon the success of the campaign.

For further information or how to start your fund raising campaign, please visit the following website: www.GeeFunding.Com

Admin
December 2, 2012
By Michael B. Sauter, Alexander E. M. Hess, Samuel Weigley and Ashley C. Allen | 24/7 Wall St



How well run are America’s 50 states? The answer depends a lot on where you live.

Every year, 24/7 Wall St. conducts an extensive survey of all fifty states in America. Based on a review of data on financial health, standard of living and government services by state we determine how well each state is managed. For the first time, North Dakota is the best run. California is the worst run for the second year in a row.

The successful management of a state is difficult to measure. Factors that affect its finances and population may be the result of decisions made years ago. A state’s difficulties can be caused by poor governance or by external factors, such as extreme weather.

A state with abundant natural resources should have an easier time balancing its budget than one starved for resources. Regional problems or the national decline of certain industries can destroy local economies. The subprime mortgage crisis, for example, disproportionately affected states with strong construction and real estate markets.

Such factors can be easily identified and noted as possible causes for a state’s poverty levels, unemployment, or strained coffers.

Despite this, it is the responsibility of each state to deal with the resources at its disposal. Each government must anticipate economic shifts and diversify its industries and attract new business. A state should be able to raise enough revenue to ensure the safety of its citizens and minimize hardship without spending more than it can prudently afford. Some states have historically done this much better than others.

To determine how well the states are run, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed hundreds of data sets from dozens of sources. We looked at each state’s debt, revenue, expenditure and deficit to determine how well it is managed fiscally. We reviewed taxes, exports, and GDP growth, including a breakdown by sector, to identify how each state is managing its resources. We looked at poverty, income, unemployment, high school graduation, violent crime and foreclosure rates to measure if residents are prospering.

The best-run states have certain characteristics in common, as do the worst run. The high-ranking states all have well-managed budgets. Each of the top ten has a perfect, or near-perfect, credit rating from Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s, or both. Of the ten worst-ranked, only three received top scores from one agency, and none from both.

California is currently the only state rated A- by S&P, the lowest score given to any state. These poor-ranked states have high debt relative to both income and expenditure.

There is a strong correlation between well-educated populations and generally well-managed states. Of the ten best-scoring states on our list, nine have among the highest percentages of adults with high school diplomas.

Employment is also closely correlated to how well a state is managed. The unemployment rates of most of the poorly ranked states are among the highest in the country. Nine of the ten best-ranked states had an unemployment rate of less than 7% in 2011. This includes North Dakota, which had the lowest rate in the country in 2011, at just 3.6%. The average unemployment rate nationwide was 8.9% in 2011.

Best-Run States:

1. North Dakota



> Debt per capita: $3,282 (22nd lowest)
> Budget deficit: None
> Unemployment: 3.5% (the lowest)
> Median household income: $51,704 (20th highest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 12.2% (13th lowest)


For the first time, North Dakota ranks as the best run state in the country. In recent years, North Dakota’s oil boom has transformed its economy. Last year, crude oil production rose 35%. As of August, 2012, it was the second-largest oil producer in the country. This was due to the use of hydraulic fracturing in the state’s Bakken shale formation. The oil and gas boom brought jobs to North Dakota, which had the nation’s lowest unemployment rate in 2011 at 3.5%, and economic growth. Between 2010 and 2011, North Dakota’s GDP jumped 7.6%, by far the largest increase in the nation. This growth has also increased home values, which rose a nation-leading 29% between 2006 and 2011. North Dakota and Montana are the only two states that have not reported a budget shortfall since fiscal 2009.

2. Wyoming


> Debt per capita: $2,694 (18th lowest)
> Budget deficit: 10.3% (32nd largest)
> Unemployment: 6.0% (7th lowest)
> Median household income: $56,322 (13th highest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 11.3% (6th lowest)


Wyoming is not the best-run state in the nation this year. The drop is largely due to the state’s contracting economy. In 2011, GDP shrunk by 1.2%, more than any other state. As a whole, however, the state is a model of good management and a prospering population. The state is particularly efficient at managing its debt, owing the equivalent of just 20.4% of annual revenue in fiscal 2010. Wyoming also has a tax structure that, according to the Tax Foundation, is the nation’s most-favorable for businesses — it does not have any corporate income taxes. The state has experienced an energy boom in recent years. The mining industry, which includes oil and gas extracting, accounted for 29.4% of the state’s GDP in 2011 alone, more than in any other state. As of last year, Wyoming’s poverty, home foreclosure, and unemployment rates were all among the lowest in the nation.

3. Nebraska


> Debt per capita: $1,279 (2nd lowest)
> Budget deficit: 9.7% (34th largest)
> Unemployment: 4.4% (2nd lowest)
> Median household income: $50,296 (22nd highest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 13.1% (tied-15th lowest)

Last year, Nebraska had the second-lowest unemployment rate in the nation at 4.4%. In Lincoln, the state capital, the unemployment rate was 4%, lower than all metropolitan areas in the country, except Bismarck and Fargo in North Dakota. Although far from the nation’s wealthiest state — median income was slightly lower than the U.S. median of $50,502 — Nebraska’s economy is strong relative to the rest of the U.S. The state is one of the leading agricultural producers, with the sector accounting for 8.3% of the state’s GDP last year. The state also had the second-lowest debt per capita in the country in fiscal 2010, at $1,279, compared to an average of $3,614 for states nationwide.

4. Utah


> Debt per capita: $2,356 (15th lowest)
> Budget deficit: 14.7% (25th largest)
> Unemployment: 6.7% (tied-11th lowest)
> Median household income: $55,869 (14th highest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 13.5% (tied-17th lowest)

In fiscal 2011, Utah had a budget deficit of $700 million, equal to 14.7% of the state’s GDP. This debt-to-GDP ratio is worse than half the states in the U.S. Despite these problems, Utah has committed to reducing expenses in place of raising taxes or increasing debt. The state has also limited its borrowing. Its total debt was just under $6.5 billion in fiscal 2010, or $2,356 per capita — less than most states — and 40.4% of 2010 tax revenue. Both Moody’s and S&P gave Utah their highest credit ratings because of the state’s strong fiscal management. Moody’s commented that Utah has a “tradition of conservative fiscal management; rebuilding of budgetary reserves after their use in the recession; [and] a closely managed debt portfolio.”

5. Iowa


> Debt per capita: $1,690 (7th lowest)
> Budget deficit: 20.3% (18th largest)
> Unemployment: 5.9% (6th lowest)
> Median household income: $49,427 (24th highest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 12.8% (14th lowest)

Like many of the other well-run states, Iowa is one of the nation’s top agricultural centers — the industry accounted for 6.6% of the state’s GDP in 2011. The farm economy has contributed significantly to growth, with farm earnings rising rapidly and land values skyrocketing. State GDP rose by 1.9% between 2010 and 2011 — the 12th-highest increase in the country. Iowa’s unemployment rate fell from 6.3% in 2010 to just 5.9% in 2011, the nation’s sixth-lowest rate. The state has carried a low debt burden in recent years, averaging just $1,690 per capita in fiscal 2010, among the nation’s lowest. The state currently has the best possible credit ratings both from Moody’s and S&P.

Worst-Run States:

50. California


> Debt per capita: $4,008 (18th highest)
> Budget deficit: 20.7% (17th largest)
> Unemployment: 11.7% (2nd highest)
> Median household income: $57,287 (10th highest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 16.6% (18th highest)

California is 24/7 Wall St.’s “Worst Run State” for the second year in a row. Due to high levels of debt, the state’s S&P credit rating is the worst of all states, while its Moody’s credit rating is the second-worst. Much of California’s fiscal woes involve the economic downturn. Home prices plunged by 33.6% between 2006 and 2011, worse than all states except for three. The state’s foreclosure rate and unemployment rate were the third- and second-highest in the country, respectively. But efforts to get finances on track are moving forward. State voters passed a ballot initiative to raise sales taxes as well as income taxes for people who make at least $250,000 a year. While median income is the 10th-highest in the country, the state also has one of the highest tax burdens on income. According to the Tax Foundation, the state also has the third-worst business tax climate in the country.

49. Rhode Island


> Debt per capita: $9,018 (3rd highest)
> Budget deficit: 13.4% (28th largest)
> Unemployment: 11.3% (3rd highest)
> Median household income: $53,636 (17th highest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 14.7% (24th lowest)

Rhode Island’s finances were a mess in fiscal 2010. The state had $9.5 billion in unpaid debts, which came to 107.2% of that year’s revenues.At more than $9,000 per person, it’s one of the largest debt burdens in the country. The state also funded less than half of its pension obligations, worse than all states except for Illinois. In 2010, in a spectacular example of fiscal mismanagement, the state guaranteed a $75 million loan to a video game company, which has since defaulted. With one of the nation’s slowest growth rates and the third-highest unemployment rate in the U.S., at 11.3%, Rhode Island’s economy performed poorly overall.

48. Illinois


> Debt per capita: $4,790 (11th highest)
> Budget deficit: 40.2% (2nd largest)
> Unemployment: 9.8% (tied-10th highest)
> Median household income: $53,234 (18th highest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 15.0% (25th highest)

Although many states have budget issues, Illinois’ faces among the biggest problems. In 2010, the state’s budget shortfall was more than 40% of its general fund, the second-highest of any state. Both S&P and Moody’s gave Illinois credit ratings that were the second-worst of all states. In addition, the state only funded 45% of its pension liability in 2010, the lowest percentage of any state. Governor Patrick Quinn has made the now-$85 billion pension gap a top priority for the new legislative session beginning in January.

47. Arizona


> Debt per capita: $2,188 (12th lowest)
> Budget deficit: 39.0% (3rd largest)
> Unemployment: 9.5% (tied-13th highest)
> Median household income: $46,709 (21st lowest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 19.0% (tied-8th highest)

Between 2006 and 2011, the value of homes in Arizona tumbled by 35%, more than every state except for Nevada. The state also had the nation’s second-highest foreclosure rate in 2011, with one in every 24 homes in foreclosure. In the aftermath of the financial crisis, Arizona had some of the nation’s largest budget shortfalls. In fiscal 2010, the state had a shortfall of $5.1 billion, equal to 65% of its general fund. In fiscal 2011, Arizona’s budget deficit was 39.0% of its general fund, the third-highest in the nation. In the recent state elections, residents voted on several measures intended to shore up the state’s finances. Voters rejected the continuation of a sales tax hike, while approving the restructuring of the state’s property tax assessment system.

46. New Jersey


> Debt per capita: $6,944 (5th highest)
> Budget deficit: 38.2% (4th largest)
> Unemployment: 9.3% (14th highest)
> Median household income: $67,458 (3rd highest)
> Pct. below poverty line: 10.4% (3rd lowest)

Between 2010 and 2011, New Jersey’s GDP contracted by 0.5%, more than all but three other states. The state’s median household income and poverty rate were both third best in the nation. On the other hand, the state’s tax burden on its residents was second highest in the U.S. in 2010. Residents paid 12.4% of their income in state and local taxes, higher than any other state except New York. The state has many budget problems, as well. New Jersey’s debt as a percentage of revenue was 91.6%, the fifth-highest of all states.

Methodology

24/7 Wall St. considered data from a number of sources, including Standard & Poor’s, the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the U.S. Census Bureau, the Tax Foundation, RealtyTrac, The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National Conference of State Legislators.

Unemployment data was taken from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Credit ratings were from ratings agencies S&P and Moody’s. We relied on the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report for violent crime rate by state and large metropolitan areas. RealtyTrac provided foreclosure rates.

A significant amount of the data we used came from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Data from ACS included percentage of residents below the poverty line, high school completion for those 25 and older, median household income, percentage of the population without health insurance and the change in median home values from 2006 to 2011. These are the values we used in our ranking.

Once we reviewed the sources and compiled the final metrics, we ranked each state based on its performance in all the categories. All data are for the full year 2011, with the exception of debt per capita, obtained from the Tax Foundation, and state budgetary data, which came from the U.S. Census Bureau, and is for fiscal year 2010. New to this year’s study was our more detailed review of state industry for 2011, from the the Bureau of Economic Analysis, exports per capita for 2011, from the Census Bureau, and the 2010 tax burden and the current tax business climate, from the Tax Foundation.

How did your state do?